call +44 20 7096 1079

Advisory

Our Advisory Councillors are technology and campaigning experts. It is their responsibility to:

  • Provide guidance on the Open Rights Group’s policies
  • Contribute to the ongoing policy debate and to individual issues
  • Fundraise and/or make fundraising introductions
  • Introduce ORG to other experts and organisations
  • Be available for media contact if required

 

Richard Allan

Richard Allan

Richard Allan has worked on information technology policy issues for over 10 years. With an interest in very old and very new things, Richard studied and worked in archaeology before moving into IT. He built information systems for the National Health Service during the early 1990’s. From 1997 to 2005, he was Liberal Democrat MP for Sheffield Hallam. In Parliament, Richard specialised in IT policy taking a leading role on the Data Protection Act, Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act and Communications Act. During this time, he was Chair of the House of Commons Information Committee and a member of the Public Accounts Committee. He left Parliament in 2005 and now works in the technology sector. He was made a life peer as Baron Allan of Hallam in 2010.

Nick Bohm

Nick Bohm

Nick (Nicholas) Bohm is a retired solicitor, a member of the Law Society's Technology and Law Reference Group and a guest lecturer at the Cambridge University Computer Laboratory. In addition, Nick is the General Counsel for the Foundation for Information Policy Research

Heather Brooke

Heather Brooke

Heather Brooke is a journalist and writer living in London. She is the author of 'Your Right to Know', a citizens' guide to using the Freedom of Information Act. In May 2008, she won a High Court case against the House of Commons for the full disclosure of MPs' second homes allowances. The ruling resulted in calls for full-scale reform of the Parliamentary expense system. Her book 'The Silent State: How Secrecy & Misinformation is Destroying Democracy' was published in 2010 by Heinemann. Heather was runner-up for the inaugural Paul Foot award for investigative journalism and her project 'Justice by postcode' for The Times was one of the first examples of computer-assisted reporting in the UK. She is a visiting fellow at City University's Department of Journalism and is a consultant and presenter on several Dispatches documentaries for Channel 4. Prior to moving to the UK, Heather was a newspaper reporter covering politics and crime and has just finished writing her first crime novel.

Ian Brown

Ian Brown

Ian Brown works on a range of computer science and public policy issues as a senior research fellow at Oxford Internet Institute. He has campaigned for stronger privacy laws and more balanced intellectual property regimes for over a decade as a trustee and adviser of NGOs such as European Digital Rights, Privacy International, No2ID and the Foundation for Information Policy Research. He has also consulted for a range of organisations including the BBC, Greenpeace, Credit Suisse, JP Morgan and the US Department of Homeland Security.

John Buckman

John Buckman

John Buckman is the founder of Magnatune, the largest online store/recording company/media website that uses Creative Commons licenses. Magnatune selects its own artists, sells its catalog of music through online downloads and print-on-demand CDs and licenses music for commercial and non-commercial use. Frustrated by the music industry's unfair treatment of artists, Buckman decided to create Magnatune as an artist-friendly record label that shares profits equally with musicians and allows them to retain the rights to their work. Magnatune has successfully used Creative Commons and open source principles to establish a new kind of business model for the music industry, and is believed to be the creator of the term "open music". His most recent project is BookMooch, a non-profit online used book exchange service which was launched in August 2006. In November 2006, Buckman was elected to the Board of Directors of the Creative Commons as well as the Metabrainz Foundation.

Trevor Callaghan

Trevor Callaghan

Trevor Callaghan is Senior Product Counsel for Europe with Google. Before joining Google in October 2005, Trevor worked as an assistant in the TMT & IP practice at Slaughter and May, which he joined on qualification in 1998. Trevor rides his bike to work and listens to loud rock music. He is also passionate about new technology, the development of internet-based services and the principle of free, open access to information.

Richard Clayton

Richard Clayton

Richard Clayton has a background in software development, joint-owing the successful 1980s UK software house "Locomotive Software", which developed the system software for Amstrad's CPC Home Computers and the word processing software "LocoScript" for Amstrad's hugely successful PCW machines. In the 1990s he led the team that developed Turnpike, one of the first Windows based Internet access packages. In 1995 Locomotive was sold to Demon Internet, then the largest UK ISP, and Richard worked for Demon on software development and, increasingly, regulatory issues. In 2000 he became a researcher at the Computer Laboratory at the University of Cambridge and his PhD thesis on "Anonymity and Traceability in Cyberspace" was completed in 2005. Although he continues to consult for Demon and the ISP industry, he remains in academia at Cambridge with numerous publications on censorship, spam, and other "abuse-of-the-Internet" issues.

Tom Coates

Tom Coates

Tom Coates currently works for Yahoo, promoting social media and social software and scheming up innovative new applications and products. Before that, he ran a small R&D team at BBC Radio & Music Interactive, working to make BBC media navigable, addressable and explorable, finding new models for engagement and annotation. Before that, he worked with UpMyStreet.com developing the geo-coded online community 'UpMyStreet Conversations'. Tom has also worked as Production Editor of TimeOut.com, developed online communities with the crew behind b3ta while working at emap, contributed film reviews to the BBC's films site and written for The Guardian. Photo by Joi.

Alan Cox

Alan Cox

Alan Cox has been central to the development of the Linux kernel since its early days. He used to maintain the 2.2 branch of the Linux kernel and was the "second in command" after Linus Torvalds himself, before reducing his involvement to study for an MBA. Alan is a security and IP policy advisor for FIPR. Photo by Anna Bialkowska.

Alex Cox

Alex Cox

Alex Cox studied at Wirral Grammar School; Worcester College, Oxford; Bristol University; and UCLA. Alex is a writer, director, actor, author of books and screenplays. He presented the BBC TV series "Moviedrome" 1987 to 1994. His best-known films are 'Sid and Nancy', and 'Repo Man', often credited as one of the first truly independent movies.

Grahame Davies

Grahame Davies

Grahame Davies co-founded Demon Internet, the pioneering low-cost Internet access service, in 1992. He was Group Managing Director for Easynet Group Plc for 6 years and has been a Director and Chairman of the London Internet Exchange (LINX) since 1999. He is an active investor in a number of IT based service companies including MediaServiceProvider Ltd with a special interest in his digital sheet music website Great Scores.

Tim Davies

Tim Davies

Tim Davies is co-director of Practical Participation, an independent consultancy focussed on the intersection of rights, civic engagement and technology. Tim's current work is focussed on the social impacts of open data, including the role of open data in international development, and inclusive approaches open data use. His 2010 MSc dissertation at the Oxford Internet Institute focussed on open government data, democracy and public sector reform, and in October 2011 he starts a PhD in Web Science and Social Policy at the University of Southampton. Tim also works extensively on research and practice supporting youth-focussed organisations to engage with digital technologies, and he advocates for balanced and rights-based policy responses to young people's technology use both in the UK, and internationally through participation in the Dynamic Youth Coalition at the Internet Governance Forum.

Cory Doctorow

Cory Doctorow

Cory Doctorow is an activist, writer, blogger, public speaker, and a technology person. He evangelises on behalf of the EFF, works on policy research, participates in standards bodies, and works to enlist the support of other organizations in EFF's issues. In a previous life, he was a software entrepreneur, co-founding a company called OpenCola. He is an award-winning science fiction writer, as well as co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing and frequent contributor to Wired Magazine and the O'Reilly Network

Lilian Edwards

Lilian Edwards

Lilian Edwards is Professor of E-Governance at the University of Strathclyde. Her principal research interests are in the law relating to the Internet, the Web and new technologies, with a European and comparative focus.She has co-edited two bestselling collections on Law and the Internet (Hart Publishing, 1997 and 2000 - 3rd edn due 2008) with Charlotte Waelde, and a third collection of essays The New Legal Framework for E-Commerce in Europe was published in 2005. Her work in on-line consumer privacy won the Barbara Wellbery Memorial Prize in 2004 for the best solution to the problem of privacy and transglobal data flows. She worked at Strathclyde University from 1986-1988 and Edinburgh University from 1989 to 2006 before moving to become Chair of Internet Law at Southampton from 2006-2008. She is Associate Director, and was co-founder, of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Centre for IP and Technology Law, funded from 2002-2012. She has taught IT, e-commerce and Internet law at undergraduate and postgraduate level since 1996 and been involved with law and artificial intelligence (AI) since 1985. She has been a visiting scholar and invited lecturer to universities in the USA, Canada, Australia, Mexico, and Latin America and has undertaken consultancy for the the European Parliament, the European commission and McAfee.

Louise Ferguson

Louise Ferguson

Louise Ferguson is a user experience consultant focused on user research for strategy in the private and public sectors. Her publications include Getting By, Not Getting On: Technology in UK workplaces (The Work Foundation) and Touching the State: What does it mean to be a citizen in the 21st century? (Design Council). Louise was previously VP of the UK Chapter of the Usability Professionals Association and is a co-director of its Voting and Usability Project. She is on the Advisory Council of the Foundation for Information Policy Research and on the Management Committee of Dulwich Going Greener. She advises the Electoral Commission on the usability of elections. In her spare time she is involved in the Cinema for Crystal Palace campaign and is often to be found growing, hiking, camping, cooking, cycling, and DJing.

Ben Goldacre

Ben Goldacre

Ben Goldacre is a medical doctor, academic, and writer on evidence based practice, best known for the Bad Science column / book / website.

David Allen Green

David Allen Green is a lawyer and writer. He is head of media law at Presikel & Co LLP and was named by The Lawyer as one of the “Hot 100” lawyers for 2011. He is also legal correspondent of the New Statesman. His Jack of Kent blog was shortlisted for the George Orwell Prize in 2010.

Wendy M. Grossman

Wendy M. Grossman

Wendy M. Grossman is a freelance writer and former full-time musician who writes for the Guardian, the Daily Telegraph, ZDNet UK, and Scientific American (she has also written for New Scientist, Wired, and many other publications as well as policy reports and research). She is author of six books including net.wars (1998, NYU Press) and From Anarchy to Power: the Net Comes of Age (2001, NUYU Press), and writes a weekly column, net.wars, that appears on Fridays at NewsWireless.net and at www.pelicancrossing.net/netwars. She is founder and former editor of The Skeptic magazine and editor of the forthcoming book Why Statues Weep: The Best of The Skeptic (Philosophy Press). Her Web site pelicancrossing.net includes an extensive archive of her articles and MP3s.

Ben Hammersley

Ben Hammersley

Ben Hammersley is an English émigré, living in Florence, Italy, with his wife, three greyhounds, and the Renaissance. Galileo's little finger is in a jar only 400 yards from his desk. For a day job, he writes for the British national press, appearing in The Times, The Guardian and The Observer, but in his free time, he blogs excessively. As the author of Content Syndication with RSS, he survived the Great Fork Summer, and as a journalist he has been accosted by the secret police of two countries. To this day, he doesn't know which was worse. Photo by MartinAlvarez

William Heath

William Heath

William founded Kable Ltd, the London-based public-sector IT market research and media company which became part of Guardian New & Media in August 2007. He tries to create better understanding about the implications of computerisation on government service quality, cost and trust. He moderates the Ideal Government blog, advises the Foundation for Information Policy Research, and is a Fellow of the Young Foundation, the UK's incubator for social entrepreneurship and innovation where he's working on better feedback mechanisms about public services.

Becky Hogge

Becky Hogge

Becky Hogge is a writer and technologist and was Executive Director of the Open Rights Group in 2007 and 2008. Her views on information politics have been published and broadcast around the world. She has recently published her first book, Barefoot into Cyberspace.

Michael Holloway

Michael Holloway

Despite his love for rhythm and business, working in record labels and recording artist management left Michael disillusioned with the music industry. woreking as ORG’s Operations Manager for several years, he now shares his experience with ORG on the AC, when not working as a chef

Julian Huppert

Julian Huppert

Julian Huppert is the Liberal Democrat MP for Cambridge. He grew up and studied in Cambridge, completing a PhD in biological chemistry. He was a County Councillor for East Chesterton for eight years. Julian's work in science involved research into the structures of DNA. Julian was also CEO of a small biotech company. Julian also has a long-standing interest in Internationalism, the UN and human rights. He has organised a number of UN-based conferences, and while a student founded a series of Human Rights conferences in Spain. He is currently Chair of Trustees for a small Cambridge charity supporting awareness of the UN. Julian has also worked for the OECD including an influential 2002 report on the Bulgarian education system.

Eric Joyce

Eric Joyce

Eric Joyce is Labour MP for Falkirk. His main interests are defence, new media, the Great Lakes Region in Africa and Skills. He was a Parliamentary Private Secretary in the previous government and formerly an officer in the British Army before entering politics. He led the formation of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on reforming the Digital Economy Act.

Jason Kitcat

Jason Kitcat

Jason Kitcat is currently a Green councillor on Brighton & Hove City Council and Cabinet Member for Finance. A former member of staff, Jason worked as Assistant Executive Director and subsequently Systems Development Officer for ORG. Previously Jason was Head of Technology at Netmums, a leading grassroots parenting site. In 2007 Jason conducted research on e-voting and e-democracy for Open Rights Group. On these subjects he often speaks at conferences and is quoted in the media. He has worked with online communities since the early 1990s and has founded or co-founded a number of technology related companies. Jason blogs at jasonkitcat.com

Paula Le Dieu

Paula Le Dieu

Paula is the Director of Digital BFI as of October, 2009. Paula has worked with the BBC, Guardian, Fairfax, Ofcom and Creative Commons as well as online content and activism communities such as iCommons and the international documentary community. Her experience spans advising on the future of public service media, open culture theory and practice, the role of archives in the digital age, leading international communities of volunteers, building e-commerce solutions and sitting on the executive board of one of the leading European Documentary Festivals - Sheffield Doc/Fest - and the Open Knowledge Foundation.

Graham Linehan

Graham Linehan

Graham Linehan is a television writer, actor and director who, often in partnership with Arthur Mathews, has written or co-written a number of popular television comedies. He is most noted for his involvement in Father Ted, Black Books and The IT Crowd (in which the ORG logo has featured on set). He also co-wrote the first series of Big Train and created the 2009 #welovetheNHS Twitter hashtag campaign in response to US Republican attacks on the NHS.

Kevin Marks

Kevin Marks

Kevin Marks is author of the weblog Epeus Epigone and a software engineer at Google. He became principal engineer for Technorati after doing work for both Apple and the BBC. He is an advocate of Microformats. Photo by Davis Sifrey.

Desiree Miloshevic

Desiree Miloshevic

Desiree Miloshevic is an International Affairs and Policy Development Advisor for Afilias, operating out of Europe, London. She represents Afilias and is a speaker at many national and international organisations’ meetings and fora, including ICANN, IGF, RIPE, CENTR. Desiree also serves on the Board of Trustees of Internet Society - ISOC (2004-2010), an organisational home of the IETF. Between 2006-2009, she served a Special Adviser to the Chair of the UN Multi-stakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) on Internet governance and on the board of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR). Currently, she is a Visiting Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute (2008-), University of Oxford.

Keith Mitchell

Keith Mitchell

Keith Mitchell co-founded the UK's first commercial Internet provider, PIPEX. He served as the Executive Chairman of the London Internet Exchange and as a non-executive Director of Nominet UK. Keith was also a founder investor and Chief Technical Officer of XchangePoint, a pan-European commercial provider of Internet interconnect and peering services. Keith chairs the UK Network Operators' Forum, and currently works for the nonprofit Internet Systems Consortium

Mark Pack

Mark Pack

Mark Pack works at the communications agency Blue Rubicon and is a Visiting Lecturer in journalism at City University. One of his previous roles was Head of Innovations at the Liberal Democrats, where he headed up the party's online general election campaigns in 2001 and 2005. He still regularly features in the Daily Telegraph's annual top 50 most influential Liberal Democrats and edits Liberal Democrat Newswire. He is a member of the Chartered Institute of Public Relations's Social Media Panel and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation’s Anti-Poverty Communications Advisory Group. Amongst the 20+ books he has contributed to as author or editor is 101 Ways To Win An Election.

Andy Phippen

Andy Phippen

Andy Phippen is a professor of social responsibility in information technology at the Plymouth Business School, University of Plymouth. He has worked with the IT sector for over 15 years in a consultative capacity on issues of ethical and social responsibility, with companies such as British Telecom, Google and Facebook. He has presented written and oral evidence to parliamentary enquiries related to the public use of ICT and is widely published in the area. In recent years he has specialised in the use of ICTs by children and young people, carrying out a large amount of grass roots research on issues such as their attitudes toward privacy and data protection, file sharing and internet safety. He is a research partner with the UK Safer Internet Centre and is a frequent media commentator on children and the Internet.

Alison Powell

Alison Powell

Alison Powell is currently LSE Fellow in Media and Communications. After a brief stint in the television production industry, she obtained an MA in Communication and Culture at York University in Toronto, Canada in 2002. In 2003 she joined the Canadian Research Alliance for Community Innovation and Networking, which used action research methods to help develop capacity for community innovation. She began a PhD in 2004 at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. He doctoral work studied the development of community wireless networking in Canada, and its contributions to the North American media reform movement. During this time she also led a scholar-activist collaborative research project funded by the Social Science Research Council focused on knowledge transfer among public interest communications advocates. In Summer 2006 she was a research fellow at TelecomParisTech where she conducted a project on Wi-Fi as a public, private and shared good. From 2008 to 2010 she was an SSHRC postdoctoral research fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, where she continued to examine grassroots technology development and digital advocacy and their impact on new media technologies and policies.

Rufus Pollock

Rufus Pollock

Rufus is Director and co-founder of the Open Knowledge Foundation as well as being a member of Creative Commons UK and a country coordinator for the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure. He has worked extensively on innovation and intellectual property policy particularly in the area of software patents and copyright.

Judith Rauhofer

Judith Rauhofer

Judith Rauhofer is a a lecturer in information technology law at the ACHR/SCRIPT centre at the University of Edinburgh specialising in online privacy, data protection and online surveillance, particularly communications data retention. She is a proliferate author of articles and book chapters on these topics and a frequent speaker at conferences. During her previous life as a soliticor, she has also advised many media and new media clients in these areas. Living in the UK as a legal alien, she is forever on a quest to "bring rights home".

David Rowntree

David Rowntree

David Rowntree is the drummer with the band 'blur', an animator and a researcher in computer graphics. He's been using linux since 0.9.2, and once wrote a pcmcia device driver, before the pcmcia code merged with the kernel. David got involved with Open Rights issues while fighting (a losing battle) to make the European Copyright Directive more focussed on rights creators than rights holders.

Paul Sanders

Paul Sanders

Paul Sanders brings innovation and inclusiveness as guiding principles into his work in the digital music industry. As well as being the cofounder of several music and technology companies, including Playlouder MSP, the iconic British enabler of music and ISP partnerships, Paul takes an active role in industry bodies and Government relations. Photo by Bowbrick.

Chris Taggart

Chris Taggart

Chris Taggart is the CEO and co-founder of OpenCorporates :: The Open Database Of the Corporate World, and founder of OpenlyLocal.com. Originally a journalist and later magazine publisher, he now works full time in the field of open data, and is on the UK government's Local Public Data Panel, and Mayor of London's Digital Advisory Board.

Damian Tambini

Damian Tambini

Damian Tambini is Senior Lecturer at the London School of Economics and an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR), and at the Oxford Internet Institute. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and serves on the advisory Groups of the Oxford Media Convention and Polis. He also teaches for the TRIUM Global Executive MBA Program, an alliance of NYU Stern, the London School of Economics and HEC School of Management.

Paul Thompson

Paul Thompson

Paul Thompson is a London based internet television & film specialist, having worked for the several large media multinationals. He has also contributed to several areas of Liberal Democrat IT policy, in particular the Digital Economy Act and digital intellectual property issues, and has served as the digital intellectual property lead for their IT & Intellectual Property Policy Working Group.

Tom Watson

Tom Watson

Tom Watson is Labour MP for West Bromwich East and former Minister for Digital Engagement. He established the Power of Information task force and has campaigned to open up government more quickly to the 'net. He sits on the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee.

David Weinberger

David Weinberger

David Weinberger is a 'marketing guru' (according to the Wall Street Journal, in light of The Cluetrain Manifesto), author of Small Pieces Loosely Joined, and contributor to The New York Times, Harvard Business Review, The Miami Herald, The Boston Globe, USA Today, The Guardian, and Wired. He was a philosophy professor for six years, a comedy writer for Woody Allen for seven years and is currently a Fellow at the prestigious Harvard Berkman Institute for Internet & Society. Photo by Marco Massarott.

Dean Whitbread

Dean Whitbread

Dean Whitbread writes fiction, and runs a publishing company named after his first novel. In 2006, Dean founded the UK Podcasters Association who with the EFF and ORG successfully campaigned against WIPO's plans to impose TV regulations on the internet. More information: deanwhitbread.com

Jonathan Zittrain

Jonathan Zittrain

Jonathan Zittrain holds the Chair in Internet Governance and Regulation at Oxford University and is a principal of the Oxford Internet Institute. He is also the Jack N. & Lillian R. Berkman Visiting Professor for Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard Law School and co-founder with Charles Nesson of its Berkman Center for Internet & Society. Papers are available.