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March 07, 2014 | Jim Killock

The world we want and how we get there

Today we've published on our about page a new definition of the world we want to see, explaining how we are working to achieve our aims.

We wrote this short statement of our aims, objectives and values after asking all our supporters what you thought we should be working on, and what you thought our values are. We think it's a real call to arms:

We uphold human rights like free expression and privacy. We condemn and work against repressive laws or systems that deny people these rights.
We campaign, lobby, go to court – whatever it takes to build and support a movement for freedom in the digital age. We believe in coalition, and work with partners across the political spectrum to support an informed population of Internet users who understand and fight for their rights in the digital age.
We scrutinize and critique the policies and actions of governments, companies, and other groups as they relate to the Internet. We warn the public when policies – even well-intentioned ones – stand to undermine the freedom to use the Internet to make a better society.

It's the first major result of our strategy work, which this year has involved ORG talking to all of our supporters, local groups, partners and allies, as well as our staff, board and Advisory Council about our work and our future.

On April 12, many of our supporters and volunteers will be meeting to discuss our future. We're looking at quite a few options for new projects and initiatives, and thinking hard about how we grow over the next three years.

We want to involve you in two ways. Firstly, if you're a long term volunteer and want to come to the strategy day, let me know as there are a few places left. Secondly, we will be sending a poll to all our supporters asking you how much you like the new ideas. This will help inform our discussions in April.

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Comments (1)

  1. Lloyd Barrett:
    Mar 07, 2014 at 01:26 PM

    Unfortunately the sentiments expressed in your short statement will prove futile until those that make key decisions at Gov't level are not in the pockets of the big corporates who see the internet and its use as exclusively theirs. Governments will not sit easy knowing the speed at which information can spread on the Internet unfortunately the only way they can regain control is through legislation ( often in league with big corporate).

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