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April 01, 2009 |

EU governments vote against copyright extension in Brussels

Copyright term extension was dealt another serious blow last week when COREPER, the European Committee representing EU member states and the Council of Ministers, voted against the proposal.

Image by TPCOM from Flickr under CC

In a surprise move the UK government joined others in a blocking minority, rejecting a compromise deal that would have delivered minimal benefits to performers. It now seems increasingly unlikely that a deal on copyright extension will be reached by EU countries before the EU Parliament first reading plenary vote takes place.

John Denham, secretary of state for innovation, said: “It is clear that today’s outcome will not kill off the proposals to extend copyright term, but rather that member states need more time to consider that details of the proposal and reach an agreement”. Reaction to the moves also came from the Featured Artists' Coalition, a new musicians pressure group including members of Blur and Radiohead, who released a statement supporting the UK government's position stating that the "compromise" would not be good for performers or fans.

The copyright term extension proposal is a bad deal for European consumers, musicians and follow-on innovators. Full plenary vote will take place soon in the European parliament, so contact your MEPs and let your government know copyright term extension is the wrong move.

Image by TPCOM at Flickr under CC.

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Comments (5)

  1. Nick:
    Apr 09, 2009 at 09:18 AM

    there is huge pressure from the European Commission on some Member States to change their position. After the COREPER on 27 March, the Czech Presidency decided to negotiate with the European Parliament on a compromise although they did not have a mandate from the Council. MEP Crowley from Ireland agreed to accept the UK proposal as a compromise and the Czechs convened an exceptional meeting of Member States on 2 April to recount the votes, hoping that the blocking group would collapse. The UK officials accepted the proposal. Fortunately, the rest of the countries did not give in the pressure and blocked the proposal again. But the game is not over yet. The European Commission continues putting pressure on some Member States, which raises serious doubts as to the legitimacy of the practices of the European Commission and their over passionate with their proposal, despite a general consensus that their proposal could actually have been drafted by the lobbyists of recording companies.

  2. L’europe refuse (pour l’instant) l’extension des droits voisins | Jokester:
    Apr 03, 2009 at 07:37 PM

    [...] l’article sur le site de l’ Open Rights group.   Cet article a été publié le Vendredi 3 avril 2009 à 19 h 32 min et a été classé [...]

  3. David:
    Apr 07, 2009 at 01:32 PM

    We have a secretary of state for innovation? Wow. Make the ministry of silly walks sketch today and it would be a satire.

    On the Featured Artists Coalition, I don't think their proposition sounds much better than the labels. From the BBC article, it sounds like they still want the copyright extension, but in terms that favour them. OK, it's marginally better than what was being tabled, but I've yet to hear a convincing argument for why copyright should be extended at all, especially when considering, not just how much mainstream artists earn currently, but how they waste it all on fast cars and rehab clinics.

  4. 3er NO a la extensión del copyright en la UE at Esta Europa No!:
    Apr 02, 2009 at 09:23 AM

    [...] 3er NO a la extensión del copyright en la UE Publicado por Esta Europa NO on Apr 2nd, 2007 en Esta Europa NO, Internet con ningún comentario Versiones Latoces pt gl oc ca »Por tercera vez la Comisión Europea tramitó la votación sobre la extensión del copyright, y por tercera vez el europarlamento le dijo que no. Nos lo cuenta la gente de Open Rights Group. [...]

  5. Good news on copyright, but bad news on protection for sources | Technovia:
    Apr 02, 2009 at 04:34 PM

    [...] Some great news from Brussels on the attempt to extend copyright terms, again: “Copyright term extension was dealt another serious blow last week when COREPER, the European Committee representing EU member states and the Council of Ministers, voted against the proposal. In a surprise move the UK government joined others in a blocking minority, rejecting a compromise deal that would have delivered minimal benefits to performers. It now seems increasingly unlikely that a deal on copyright extension will be reached by EU countries before the EU Parliament first reading plenary vote takes place.” [...]



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